Christian Living

It’s time to stop the blame game

By Sabrina Peters
couple on bench

Blame-shifting is a deeply ingrained human response, almost like our default setting. It’s a behaviour we’ve seen since the dawn of humanity – just consider the story of Adam and Eve. Even in our daily lives, it’s not uncommon to see our children resorting to blame when things go awry. If I’m honest, I’ve fallen into this trap more times than I can count.

Let’s explore a more constructive perspective on moving away from the blame game.

OWN YOUR ACTIONS

As the famous Dr. Phil often says, “You can’t change what you don’t acknowledge.” This wisdom serves as a reminder that personal growth and transformation begin with self-awareness. Blaming your spouse for your emotions or actions may be a tempting reflex, but it ultimately hinders your own development.

THE ONLY PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR THOUGHTS, EMOTIONS, AND ACTIONS IS YOU.

When we shift blame onto others for our behavior, we unknowingly surrender the power to change and grow. It’s a self-imposed limitation that keeps us stuck in patterns of conflict and discontent. As long as we attribute our circumstances and character solely to external factors, our lives remain stagnant.

TRUE PROGRESS BEGINS WHEN WE TURN OUR GAZE INWARD, CONFRONTING OUR OWN THOUGHTS, EMOTIONS, AND ACTIONS.

In this introspective journey, we discover the agency to transform ourselves and, consequently, our relationships. By taking responsibility for our responses and attitudes, we unlock the potential for personal development, healthier interactions, and a more fulfilling life.

REGULATE YOUR OWN EMOTIONS

Emotions represent a fascinating and intricate facet of our human experience. They can add depth, richness, and authenticity to our lives, but they can also present challenges, particularly in the context of our relationships. As a therapist, I often see how unregulated emotions can become a source of turmoil, causing misunderstandings, conflicts, and emotional distress between individuals. It’s not uncommon for all of us to have moments when we react impulsively or excessively, allowing our emotions to take the lead rather than responding thoughtfully. However, the reassuring aspect of this is that emotional regulation, coupled with the development of emotional literacy and distress tolerance, is an attainable skillset that can empower us to navigate our emotional landscapes more effectively and nurture healthier relationships.

Emotional regulation involves the ability to recognise, understand, and manage our emotional responses to various situations. It doesn’t imply suppressing or denying our feelings but rather learning to respond to them in a balanced and constructive manner. By enhancing our emotional literacy, we become more adept at identifying and articulating our emotions, both to ourselves and to others. This improved emotional vocabulary allows for more accurate communication of our needs, desires, and concerns within our relationships.

Additionally, distress tolerance play a pivotal role in emotional regulation. These skills enable us to navigate challenging and distressing situations without reacting impulsively or withdrawing from them. Instead of letting our emotions dictate our responses, we can learn to stay grounded, make rational decisions, and maintain healthier interactions with our loved ones.

EMOTIONS START WITH THOUGHTS: WHAT WE THINK, WE FEEL, WE SPEAK, AND EVENTUALLY, WE DO.

If you find yourself struggling with managing your emotions, as we all do at times, here’s a helpful approach: focus on your thought patterns. Are there negative mindsets that need a positive makeover? Are past hurts casting shadows on your present? Practice mindfulness, prayerful reflection, and heightened self-awareness of your feelings.

By becoming more aware of our thought life and replacing negative thoughts with positive ones, we can learn to regulate our emotions effectively. This skill becomes especially valuable in handling conflicts, managing toxic emotions, and reducing tension in our marriages.

Remember, emotions are a beautiful part of being human, and with the right skills, we can harness their power for positive change in our lives and the lives of those we love.

COMMUNICATE WITH KINDNESS

Effective communication serves as the lifeblood of any marriage, wielding the remarkable ability to either enhance or hinder the bond between spouses. It’s worth noting the intriguing statistic that communication is not solely about words; instead, it encompasses a complex blend of verbal and non-verbal elements. In fact, studies suggest that only 7% of communication relies on verbal content, while a significant 93% is conveyed through non-verbal cues. This non-verbal realm can be further broken down into 55% attributed to facial expressions, gestures, and postures, and an additional 38% originating from the tone of voice.

IT’S NOT WHAT YOU SAY, IT’S HOW YOU SAY IT. TONE IS EVERYTHING.

Tone emerges as the linchpin of effective communication. When confronted with an issue, responding with gentleness becomes a potent antidote to potential conflict. A gentle response has the remarkable ability to disarm another’s anger, diffusing tension in the process. Conversely, resorting to sharp and cutting words is likened to adding fuel to the fire, exacerbating the situation. Proverbs 15:1 beautifully encapsulates this wisdom.

In pursuit of effective communication, it’s beneficial to steer clear of universal language, such as “always,” “never,” or “all the time.” Instead, strive to use “I statements” whenever possible.

APOLOGISE REGULARLY

The phrase “I’m sorry” holds immense transformative power. It’s not an admission of weakness but a courageous act of vulnerability and empathy.

SCIENTIFICALLY, APOLOGIES ACT AS A BRIDGE BETWEEN EMOTIONAL WOUNDS AND HEALING.

When we offer a sincere apology, it acknowledges the hurt caused and expresses our commitment to mend what’s been broken. In the world of psychology, the act of apologising is recognized as a valuable tool for repairing interpersonal relationships. It signifies emotional intelligence and the ability to recognise the impact of our actions on our partners. Just as importantly, it paves the way for forgiveness, a cornerstone of relational strength.

The first to apologise demonstrates immense courage, while the first to forgive showcases inner strength. And the first to forget finds themselves embracing genuine happiness, unburdened by grudges or resentment.

It’s crucial to remember that a genuine apology requires no excuses. Instead, it stands alone, a powerful agent of repair. Much like super glue, it possesses the remarkable capacity to mend what may seem irreparable in the fabric of a relationship.

PURSUE PERSONAL WHOLENESS

The truth is two halves don’t make a whole. Marriage really needs to consist of two healthy, whole, happy individuals for it to flourish.

PERSONAL WHOLENESS – LEADS TO JOINT BENEFIT.

Marriage thrives when it consists of two emotionally healthy, complete individuals. Psychological research highlights that personal well-being directly impacts the quality of a relationship. When both partners prioritise their individual growth and mental health, it enhances the overall resilience of the marriage. Achieving personal wholeness involves shedding emotional baggage—past traumas, disappointments, and negative experiences. This process enables individuals to embrace the present and future unburdened.

Cultivating a supportive community, whether through religious, professional, or social networks, plays a crucial role in personal development. Spiritual practices like prayer and self-reflection, often backed by scientific studies, contribute to emotional stability and self-awareness.

Additionally, seeking counseling or therapy can provide evidence-based strategies for personal growth, further strengthening the foundation of a healthy marriage. In essence, personal wholeness is a scientifically endorsed journey of self-discovery and emotional well-being that profoundly impacts marital success. By embracing these principles, couples can navigate the challenges of married life with greater empathy, resilience, and the potential for lasting happiness.

***

Sabrina Peters is a Christian writer, an avid Sex & Relationships blogger and part of the team at Kingdomcity. She is married to Ben and mother to Liberty & Lincoln. www.sabrinapeters.com.

More Articles Like This